Rooting for Truth 寻找真相 with NARA

Patience and perseverance. That’s what one needs to unlock the information stored at NARA, the National Archives & Records Administration. I filed a request on-line, but I had better luck on the telephone. Start earlier than later and be persistent.

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NARA – San Bruno, California

When I finally got through to an archivist and had my appointment, I felt a sense of anticipation. The day arrived, forms filled out, orientation completed, researcher card in hand, I was ready to enter the reading room, where I went through a second training, this time for the reading room rules. At last, I was prepared to dig into the three files the archivist pulled for me: one for my dad, one for my uncle Don, and one for someone named Louie Mow.

Chinese use the surname乳名 rŭming first, which caused confusion for some Chinese immigrants. For instance, Lisa See’s great-grandfather’s name was Fong See. In the Chinese tradition, he was Mr. Fong, with a given name See, however, in the Western tradition, he was labeled Mr. See, with a given name Fong. (On Gold Mountain: The One-hundred-year Odyssey of My Chinese-American Family, Lisa See, 1965)

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I set the Louie Mow file aside and began reading Dad’s file only to discover that Louie Mow was my grandfather, and then I found out about another Chinese tradition. The Chinese use a ruming乳名 (a birth name also called a milk name until a certain age) about twenty years old. Then, they are given a courtesy name or style name zi 字,which becomes their adult name. Sometimes, they are also given an honorific name.

Louie Mow was my grandfather’s birth name. He entered the United States when he was eighteen years old. Louie Hong Wai, the name I knew for my grandfather, was his adult name.

Louie Hung On was my father’s birth name. Louie Hung On became Louie Jia Jin/Louie Gar Gin and also James On Louie. Dad assumed an American name, James, which he attached to his second character “On.” Did I mention the different dialects? There are eleven main dialects (language particular to a region), but there may be as many as two hundred dialects in China. Therefore, Louie Jia Jin in Putonghua, aka modern Chinese, and Louie Gar Gin in Cantonese, at least my father’s version of Cantonese or Taishanese. Since I do not speak, read or write Chinese, the website MDBG  has been helpful to me (www.mdbg.net), but my roots guides recommend Pleco (http://www.pleco.com).

And then, there is a generational name. My grandfather’s brothers (Louie Fon and Louie Kaow) did not share a generational name, at least, as far I know. However, my father’s brothers (Louie Hung Don, Louie Hung Him, Louie Hung Hor, and Louie Hung Hay) shared the generational name, Hung. The generational name usually comes from a generation poem. I have not discovered our generational poem yet, or why my grandfather’s generation did not conform to that tradition. If there is a family poem, I hope that I will find it in China.

Keeping track of who is who is a challenge, especially when a person spells his name one way on one paper and another way on another paper. Additionally, many words sound the same but have different meanings in the Chinese language. For instance, 馬 mǎ (horse) versus 媽 mā   (ma / mom / mother). Thank goodness for my friends at Roots who are helping me sort all of this out and for the apps to help me write the words properly. Even though I do not speak, read, or write Chinese, this process is helping me learn the language.

Thank goodness that I’m organized. Organization. Add that trait to the list of how to unlock the secrets, I mean information, at NARA. One of the clues to discerning whether you have the correct Chinese name or not is to know the way it is written in Chinese calligraphy.

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My grandfather’s signature from his records at NARA.

Back to the files: out poured dates, indicating many trips back and forth to China, to carry on their import businesses going back to 1865. 1865! The year the Civil War ended. Holy Mackerel! I had no idea our family traveled to the Gold Mountain, what Chinese people called the United States, that long ago. Could my family have come in search of gold? Chinese love gold! Me too! And if so, did they find enough gold to finance the first store and create a pathway for the future members of the Louie clan by establishing a multi-partnered business and circumnavigating the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, which prohibited all immigration of Chinese laborers?

Reading through my grandfather’s file, I discovered another name. This time, it was my grandfather’s father. My great-grandfather, Louie Fat. OMG! I requested his file for my next trip to NARA and my ancestors’ lives unfolded for me. If the San Francisco earthquake in 1906 had not destroyed old files, I would have found Louie Fat’s father’s file. I hope the business partners file will tell me more, but reading through the records of the hearings, I found evidence that my ancestors had a menagerie of Caucasian friends to vouch for them and the gumption to hire a lawyer to state their case. One such man was G.T. Marsh, who fell in love with all things Oriental and opened one of the first Asian art galleries in the United States. Marsh owned a shop in the Palace Hotel on Market Street and bought and sold Chinese and Japanese merchandise from Louie Fat for many years. I can imagine them traveling together on buying expeditions and meeting for tea to discuss their marketing strategies.

Undaunted by the many papers in many files, I plowed through them to glean whatever I could about my family’s history. The images of my family are appearing in my mind and tugging at my heart. Don’t be discouraged. You can wrap your mind around the data. Here are three more tips to help you when you go to NARA:

  1. Look for anything that gives you case file numbers. One person’s file might have a wealth of information about other members of the family. For instance, a “Reference Sheet” for my great-grandfather listed ten other relatives with their case numbers. Yeah! More files to dig into on my next trip to NARA.
  2. Take a flash drive with a large memory capacity to store the file(s), otherwise, you can spend a fortune on copying the pages. The archivists at NARA will copy the files for you for a fee. The flash drive makes it easier for you to download the whole file and then go back and peruse the pages that you want to focus on. It also makes it easier if you want to share the files with other family members.
  3. One of the rules about going into the research room is that anything you take into the reading room must be checked and stamped by an archivist. So, if you do not want your papers messed up by the awkward placement of the stamp, leave them in the locker or bring a copy to work on. I will treasure my stamped papers as evidence of my initiation into researching my roots at NARA.

Don’t forget: patience, perseverance, persistence, and organization. Any maybe a little help from your ancestors. One last thing, bring tissues. What you will find just might make you “cry for happy.”

Kāi xīn! 开心 Have a great time!

 

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The Political Zoo, Part 2

Bet you are wondering what I came up with in this exercise! But first, a message from our sponsor. Just kidding! No ads here, a “shout out,” but no ads.

Your responses were fascinating. Do you think that someday we can all come to the watering hole in peace?

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As I mentioned, there’s more to the exercise. So, here goes:

First, breathe in deeply and breathe out. Did you know that focusing on your breath like that relaxes your body, mind and spirit? Remember the animal you imagined for Hilary Clinton. Now, from that place within you that knows unconditional love. If that’s another tough climb, just do the best you can. Most people love their spouse, their children, a pet, their parents. Whatever connects you with love, even if it seems silly to someone else. It’s your key to the door of love. From that place within you that knows unconditional love, imagine a bridge of loving light to the animal. Again, observe without judgement and begin to notice if the animal changes and how it changes. Freeze frame the image.

Now, remember the animal you imagined for Donald Trump. Now, from that place within you that knows unconditional love. Do the best you can. Think of a loving spouse, your children, a pet, parents. Whatever connects you with love, whatever unlocks the door of love for you. From that place within you that knows unconditional love, imagine a bridge of loving light to the animal. Again, observe without judgement and begin to notice if the animal changes and how it changes. Now, freeze frame the image and take a deep bre.ath in and out, feel relaxed and calm and peaceful.

I know, some of you are saying, “Well, that was silly.” I also know that others are saying, “I imagined such and such. Where did that come from?” I’d love to hear back what happened in this part of the exercise. (If you don’t like the world to see your response, then send a message to my email carolelouie@thecenter-rva.com.)

BTW The exercise works beautifully with people that you like, too. 

Here’s the deal: the imagery was not just about Hillary or Donald. It’s also about what they reflect back to you. Remember, that Jungian thing. Like it or not, you were also seeing some aspect of you, but more importantly, you were sending unconditionally love to Hillary, Donald and you in the best way you know how.

In fact, in my humble opinion, that’s what this exercise, the current political scene, and life on this planet are all about. Opportunities to love. LOVE – PASS IT ON & PAY IT FORWARD.

LOVE – PASS IT ON & PAY IT FORWARD.

Here’s the shout out to another great movie for young and old.

PAY IT FORWARD MOVIE

FREE Summer Read: The Not So Secret Life of Emily Elizabeth

Happy Birthday, Dad, who was my first guide on the “other side.” He would have been 106! I am still working on the book,

I am still working on the book, Conversations with a Hungry Ghost: Memoir of a Reluctant Medium, which was inspired by the experiences I shared with him since 1990 when I sensed him at his funeral. I promise to finish it after my trip to Dad’s birthplace in China. Definitely, by the end of the year.

In the meantime, I finished a paranormal short story, The Not So Secret Life of Emily Elizabeth. So, I thought it only fitting to offer it for FREE to celebrate Dad and all the other ghosts who want to share their stories. CLICK HERE to pick up your copy. Enjoy!

If you like the story, please feel free to share this link with your friends and to write a review when you are finished.

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When drinking water, remember the source.

 

As I begin my roots journey to my father’s homeland with the Roots Plus group, I am inspired by the  Chinese adage “When you drink water, think of its source.”

when you drink water_calligraphy

It means to remember where and how the water came from.  Don’t just be thankful for the water: be thankful for all the elements and processes (both past and present) that allowed you to enjoy that humble cup of water. In other words, remember where one’s happiness comes from. (Wiktionary

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Meeting other Rooters at the Eat. Root. Love. Gala Saturday night felt like coming home. The sounds of Chinese chatter, plates being passed around, and lots and lots of laughter reminded me of family celebrations in Chinatown when I was a child. I feel I am going to learn a lot more about water . . . and about the source of my happiness.

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Pass it on!

It is not always easy to be a spiritual being in a physical world. When I began opening up to my spiritual path over twenty years ago, I was fortunate to discover Sanaya Roman’s book, Living with Joy, as well as her other books, courses, and meditations. Sanaya’s meditations have inspired me and helped me transform my life.

I am always delighted when Sanaya has a free offer on her website and it feels important to pass it on.

This month, Sanaya created “The Four Alignments,” designed to “assist you in living from your center through aligning with your soul, divine Self, Divine Will, and certain star energies.”

As Sanaya says . . .

There are many signs that you are out of balance such as pain, muscle tension, strong emotions, or stressful thoughts. You may have an uneasy or anxious feeling that things are not “right.” You may have too many things to do and feel overwhelmed or unable to focus. You may find yourself avoiding facing issues in your life through over-eating, or spending too much time on the internet or watching TV. . . You can turn within and align frequently throughout the day, taking just seconds to transform your life and consciousness as you do.

 

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Click here for free offer

 

Happy Year of the Monkey

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Every year I look forward to the New Year celebration. Not January 1st, but rather the Chinese New Year. The date changes every year and with it, the animal that represents the year. This year, Chinese New Year is on February 8, 2016 and it is the Year of the Monkey.

To honor my Chinese heritage, I  get together with my family for a feast, and with my friends for another feast. We do not continue all of the traditions of the new year; however, there is one tradition that I love to do because it helps me hone my psychic gifts. I learned how to read palms years ago and also to read tea leaves. I wonder what fortunes this year will bring.

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If you need a little help discerning whether this will be an auspicious or challenging year for you (and remember that fore-warned is fore-armed), here is a website that tells you what the energies of the year of the monkey mean to you, based on the year you were born (Note: Because Chinese New Year begins on a different date each year, it is important to double check your year if your birthday falls in January or February). Scroll down to “A Glance of 2016 Monkey Year Prediction.” http://www.chinesefortunecalendar.com/2016/

To celebrate, click the link to receive a free copy of my paranormal short story, The Not So Secret Life of Emily Elizabeth, on February 7 and Feb. 8th.

Gong Hay Fat Choy! (Good fortune in the new year.)

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