Celebrating Talk Story

To thank the Sponsors and all those who put in a lot of hard work to create the Talk Story Events and well as to those who attend, I’m offering a FREE copy of the e-book version of my first book, Conversations With a Hungry Ghost: Memoir of a Reluctant Medium. You can download your copy from April 12-16th. Please feel free to tell your friends and family.

“After a lifetime of blocking the ghosts who tried to talk to her, Carole found the courage to overcome her fear to speak with her father’s ghost. Their conversations helped Carole understand her father’s reluctance to share his story about his journey from China to the U.S. and guided her to the Louie family ancestral villages. Their conversations were more than a genealogical exploration; they were the beginning of a spiritual journey, a journey into the spirit world and past lives, a path of healing and love.”

 

I hope you will enjoy my story and if you do, I hope you will write a review on Amazon.

I invite you to join me at the TALK STORY EVENT on April 14th. To learn more about TALK STORY, go to my previous blog.

Rooting for Truth: A Legacy Lives On

“There is something in all of us that thrills to this experience of touching the past. It could be an old letter, a genealogical record, a battlefield, a cemetery, or fragments of an ancient text.” (James Tabor)

Those words touched me deeply as I pondered how to share the story that I’d unearthed as I searched for my roots. I had hit many walls when it came to my immediate family, but as they say, “When one door closes, another opens.” In this case, it was the door to the Forbidden City, the world’s largest palace complex, and to Yangshi Lei, the architectural family who played a part in its creation. In fact, Yangshi Lei designed and built one fifth of China’s UNESCO World Heritage Sites and was recognized by UNESCO in its Memory of the World Register.

As the 400th anniversary of the birth of Lei Fada, the progenitor of Yangshi Lei approaches, I am honored to fulfill a promise I made recently to Lei Zhangbao, the tenth-generation descendant. That promise was to share the story of Yangshi Lei with the Western World. I am pleased to announce that “The Legacy of the Lei Family Architects Lives On: The Story of Yangshi Lei” is now available on Amazon.

The Legacy of the Lei Family Architects Lives On_cover_XXXMy sincere thanks to  my sister Florence Louie Bass, who joined me on the journey in 2018 even though rooting is not her cup of tea; to my guide Liu Hao from My China Roots for her assistance with my research including finding Lei Zhangbao and arranging our meeting; to Zhangbao and his family for meeting with a distant cousin from a far away land; to Friends of Roots who helped pave the way in 2016 for this journey; to all of the Louie/Lei clan; and to my ancestors who guided me to share this amazing story.

Carole Louie, aka Lei Bao Ling 雷宝玲

 

THE CENTER – RVA

Today is a very special day – the beginning of a new chapter in my life. For over twenty-five years I have been researching reincarnation. It all started with conversations with my father’s ghost. Dad was a Chinese Buddhist, and I wondered what his beliefs in reincarnation would mean for his next life. However, like so many people, he did not know a lot about Buddhist beliefs about reincarnation.

But when the student is ready, the teacher will appear. Then, Brian Weiss, M.D., author of Many Lives Many Masters, entered my life and, like a caterpillar’s transformation into a butterfly, I began to change. Like the butterfly, whose struggle to come out of its cocoon is an important part of its process to be able to take flight in the world, I have gone through a process to prepare me for this day – the birth of THE CENTER – RVA, a center for spiritual growth.

My reincarnation research, my conversations with my father’s ghost and all the teachers who have come into my life, and putting what I have learned into practice has prepared me for this next chapter. After years of training with Sanaya Roman, Brian Weiss, M.D., and Carol Bowman, I am pleased to “move forward in the direction of my dreams.”

THE CENTER – RVA is a center without walls. It is more about a state of mind than a bricks-and-mortar place. I will offer classes, workshops and gatherings while I continue to work on the book, Conversations with a Hungry Ghost: Memoir of a Reluctant Medium, and prepare for a trip to my father’s birthplace in China with my Roots Plus group.

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Check out my website for THE CENTER – RVA and join me for my upcoming workshop, Karma 2 Dharma: From Healing the Past to Embracing Your Life Purpose.

Last, but not least, I want to say “Thank, Mom.” I had cared for her for over a year before she left her physical body in January, and I shared with her some of my beliefs about what happens and where we go when we die. It was an experience I will always treasure. So, I was not surprised when she came to me moments after she crossed over. Like a mother bird who pushes the baby bird out of the nest, she said, “Don’t be afraid. It’s time to fly.”

 

Sand Mandala -Lessons of impermanence, compassion and being in the moment

Like sand through the hourglass, our lives tick away as painstakingly as the Tibetan Buddhist monks creating the intricate patterns that make up a sand mandala. If only my life could be filled with the compassion of the Kalachakra mandala, a sacred work of art which blesses the sand – and the world – through chants and prayers. The Buddhist teaching of impermanence inspired the Kalachakra mandala.

A few years ago, I shared the sand mandala experience with my eight and five-year-old grandchildren. We marveled at the patience it took to create the design. I loved it when my five-year-old granddaughter noticed how the monk indented three small dots of green sand with a tool making what she called a “bowl” to receive three small dots of white sand.

I told them what would happen to the mandala when it was completed. “The monks will scoop up the mandala, take the sand to the pond, and release it,” I said. My eight-year-old grandson replied,

And then the pond will have a sand mandala too.

Impermanence – it is such an elusive concept to grasp. We seem to hold onto it one moment with fingers cupped in understanding only to lose it the next as if our mental fingers open up to let the “impermanence sand” drift through to join other thoughts that escape us.

I can at least follow another Buddhist premise of “being in the moment.” I can enjoy the making of the sand mandala, the joy my grandchildren and I had in watching it grow from dots to bowls, to flower designs. Finally, I can play with the idea that the sand magically reconnects in the bottom of the pond to form another sand mandala. I feel blessed with compassion to share the experience with my grandchildren and, now, with you.